The Benefits of Nordic Walking.


The most effective cardiovascular workout

Many doctors agree that Nordic walking is one of the most effective cardiovascular workouts because it works all major muscle groups in the body.

Recent studies by the Cooper Institute, Dallas, showed that Nordic walking burned more calories, increased oxygen consumption, and can be up to 46% more efficient than normal walking.

Nordic walking is also great for weight loss. By using the Nordic walking poles, you increase your heart rate on average 10-15% more than normal walking. This means you can burn well over 400 calories per hour, much more than normal walking, which only burns approximately 280. An additional energy consumption of 1500-2000 calories a week while doing physical activities reduces your risk of getting sick. You can achieve this by walking with your poles approximately 3 hours every week.

Nordic walking offers more health benefits than regular walking, jogging, biking or running.

Normal walking, even with a fast pace and good stride, only uses approximately 70% of the muscle mass in the body at any given time. Put some Nordic Walking poles in your hands, and with the proper technique, you will now be utilizing up to 90% of your body’s muscle while increasing your heart rate significantly. Just look at the picture opposite comparing heart rates between standard and Nordic Walking.


 

Nordic Walking is significantly more effective than  regular walking.

Scientific & Clinical Studies on Increased Health Benefits:

  1. Nordic Walking burns up to 46% more  calories than exercise walking without poles or  moderate jogging. 25-30% on average.  (Cooper Institute, 2004, Dallas and other).
  2. Increases heart  and cardiovascular training to 25%. (Foley 1994; Jordan 2001, Morss et al. 2001; Pocari et.al.1997 and other)
  3. Incorporates 90 % of all body muscles in one exercise and increases endurance of  arm muscles (Triceps) and neck and shoulder muscles. (Latissimus) to 38% (Karawan et al. 1992 and other)
  4. Diabetes Type 2: Improves diabetes, metabolism, reduces insulin resistance and reduces medication drastically within three months. (M.Nischwitz et.al. 2006)
  5. High Blood Pressure: Reduces High Blood Pressure by 18mmHg within eight weeks. (Ishikawa et.al. 1999; C.Diehm, 2007)
  6. Eliminates back, shoulder and neck pain (Attila et al., 1999 and other).
  7. Less impact on hip, knee, and foot joints is about 26%. (Wilson et al., 2001; Hagen 2006, and others)
  8. Increases production of “positive” hormones. Decreases “negative” hormones. (R.M. Klatz et.al., 1999; Dharma Singh Khalsa, 1997).
  9. Supports stress management and mental disorders (Stoughton 1992, Mommert-Jauch, 2003).
  10. Develops upright body posture. (Schloemmer 2005)

The Cooper Institute

The Cooper Institute in Texas compared physiological responses of Nordic Walking to regular walking. The caloric expenditure and the oxygen consumption increase on an average with 20% and the heart rate increase with about 10 beats per minute when using the Exel Nordic Walker poles. The interesting thing is that even through the body works harder using the poles, the RPE (rated perceived exertion) was the same walking with or without poles!

Dr. Tim Church said, "Some individuals increased as much as 46% in oxygen consumption and just about the same in caloric expenditure."

Quotes from the study:

"Individuals who poled more intensely had higher oxygen consumption."

"There is potential for considerably more or less benefit depending on the selection of poling-off intensity. This may have particular significance for individuals who need to increase caloric expenditure but have walking speed limitations."

"Increased caloric expenditure with no corresponding increase in perceived exertion during Nordic Walking, may have important public health applications."

"The use of Nordic Walker poles is particularly promising, as the poles provide stability that may promote physical activity among older individuals and those with orthopedic and balance concerns."

T. Church, C. Earnest, G. Morss at The Cooper Institute,
RQES, vol 73, No.3, pp. 296-300, September 2002

Comment: It is obvious, that correct Nordic Walking technique improves the efficiency of Nordic Walking!